How to Recognize and Prevent Heat Stroke in Pets

Heat stroke in pets is a serious threat to pet health You’re at the dog park one warm and humid day with your dog, and he’s running and playing with two other dogs, all having a great time. After about 5 minutes, you notice that your dog is panting rapidly, salivating, and is weak. He doesn’t want to jump into your car for the ride home. You lift him in, and he is very quiet once in the car. Is your dog in trouble? You bet.

Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that occurs when a pet cannot lower their internal body temperature. A normal dog’s temperature is 101.5 F, and a degree up or down is no problem. But cell damage occurs when the internal body temperature rises over 105 F, and the pet is also at risk for death. A trip to the veterinary emergency clinic is in order, immediately, if his life is to be saved.

Because most of us don’t carry a thermometer around, we thought it would be a good idea to share some tips. Arlington Animal Hospital offers advice on how to recognize heat stroke in pets, how to prevent it, and its treatment. Continue…

Summer Pet Safety and Ways to Keep Your Pet Cool

summer pet safetyOddly, this time of year, the very thing we’ve been looking forward to has the potential to cause health problems. In the excitement of this new season, we also need to be aware of the dangers connected to long, sunny, summer days. The heat index, (i.e., the potentially hazardous combination of extreme heat and humidity) is responsible for many seasonal fatalities. Keep your pet cool and implement summer pet safety measures. That way, your pet can enjoy (or at least tolerate) the scorching weeks ahead.

The Mugginess is Back!

It’s not uncommon to hyper-focus on parasite prevention during the summer months. However, in addition to warding off fleas, ticks, and heartworm, it’s important to also concentrate on other risks to your pet’s health and safety.

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